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strongfit designers case for apple iphone x and xs - yellow/purple

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strongfit designers case for apple iphone x and xs - yellow/purple

strongfit designers case for apple iphone x and xs - yellow/purple strongfit designers case for apple iphone x and xs - yellow/purple strongfit designers case for apple iphone x and xs - yellow/purple

strongfit designers case for apple iphone x and xs - yellow/purple

"I'm going to try."Well, that proved more difficult than I thought. I knew it was a long shot but I hoped I could connect the device to my computer and simply restore it, but sure enough, iTunes said the device was disabled and I needed to input its security code before it could sync it. I turned to Google, keying in terms like "iPod disabled for 40 years" and found plenty of other folks who'd encountered the same problem. I confirmed that you couldn't just attach the iPod to your computer and have it get recognized (at least not with a third-gen iPod Touch) as a device that had previously synced with that computer. No, you had to put your iPod Touch in DFU mode, which allegedly allowed "all iOS devices to be restored from any state."I'd done a DFU reset with an iPhone 3GS a few years back, so I had some experience with it. It requires some finesse -- you turn off the device completely, then hold the power button for 3 seconds, then hold down the home button for 10 seconds, then let go of the power button while continuing to hold the home button.

With my 3GS I pulled the maneuver off successfully after two tries, But no such luck with the disabled iPod Touch, I tried probably strongfit designers case for apple iphone x and xs - yellow/purple 25 times and got nowhere, After taking a deep breath and admitting defeat, I figured it was time to go have a chat with the experts, So I went online and made an appointment at the Upper West Side Apple store, I was pretty sure they could fix it, They had to have encountered this issue many times and must have had some sort of secret, backdoor way to restore the iPod Touch..

A visit to the Genius BarTwo days later I walked in to the Apple store and made my way down to the basement where the Genius Bar is located and where all the accessories are sold. I came in with a positive attitude. Despite my experience last year with the iMac, I was fairly optimistic that I would end up with a good outcome. I felt I was on firmer ground because I was dealing with a software problem, not a hardware issue. I figured that since the device was still clearly working -- I hadn't dropped it and had, in fact, kept it in a case the whole time, so it looked pretty pristine -- it was a software bug that Apple, not I, was responsible for. Yeah, the device was way out of warranty, but since this was a software issue, Apple would cut me some slack, particularly because I owned an iPhone, three iPod Touches, three iPads, three Apple laptops, an iMac, an Apple TV, and a bunch of iPods, including the very first one that still worked. If the geniuses couldn't fix the problem by restoring the device, they'd replace it or offer me an enticing deal on a newer model. (I didn't think repairing the device free of charge would be an option since there wasn't anything to repair.).

Yes, I understood that the disabled message was designed to deter data theft (and perhaps theft of the device, though thieves could certainly strongfit designers case for apple iphone x and xs - yellow/purple watch the same YouTube tutorial videos on how restore your iOS device that I had), But I was never warned that putting a lock on my device could prevent me from ever using it again, The last time I'd made an appointment (for the iMac issue) I had to wait almost half an hour to see someone, But that morning the store wasn't crowded and I saddled right up to the bar and presented my problem, I simply turned the device on and handed it to the genius I'd checked in with, The same disabled message appeared over my daughter's pink-and-purple camouflage background..

"Have you seen that before?" I asked. "Oh, yeah," he said. He seemed fairly unperturbed, which gave me hope. He said he just had to hook it up to a computer and put it into restore mode. I told him I tried that. "Sometimes the buttons aren't working quite properly," he said. "You have to hold them down in just the right spot. It can be a little tricky."He mentioned that with the newer iPod Touches and iOS 6 (you can't put iOS 6 on a third-gen iPod Touch), it was easier to unlock a disabled iPod Touch. It didn't lock you out for 22,656,990 minutes, which was a random huge number the iPod had generated. That explained why I'd seen other iPod Touches online with the same problem that had numbers hovering around the 40-year mark but they were marginally different.